Some victims of rape and sexual assault report having been deliberately drugged or ‘spiked’. If you have been sexually assaulted, whether as an adult or a young person, it is important to remember that it wasn’t your fault. Sexual violence is a crime, no matter who commits it or where it happens. Don’t be afraid to get help.

 

Alcohol

The main drug associated with sexual violence is Alcohol.  Alcohol can be taken voluntarily or sometimes drinks are ‘spiked’ with stronger drinks or additional measures before the rape or sexual assault.

 

Drugs

Certain drugs are more commonly associated with sexual violence.  Drugs can make people become physically weak or pass out.   Rohypnol is well known, although many other prescription drugs and illicit substances are used including ketamine, temazepam, valium, GBL and GHB.  Most of these drugs have no colour, smell, or taste and people often do not know that they have taken them.

 

The effects
Depending on the drug, the effects of these can vary but include:-

  • Feeling really tired or sleepy
  • slurred speech
  • Have a very slow or very fast heartbeat
  • nausea and/or vomiting
  • confusion
  • poor balance and coordination
  • aggression
  • decrease in inhibitions or acting out of character
  • Things not feeling real
  • Hallucinations – hearing, seeing, feeling, smelling, or even tasting things that are not real
  • Have trouble moving or controlling your muscles

Alcohol can make the effects of these drugs even stronger and can cause serious health problems such as difficulty breathing, seizures

 

If you have been affected

 

There is support available that is free and confidential, even if you do not remember much of what happened. No matter how much you drank or what drugs you took, sexual assault is never your fault. It’s common to go through a range of emotions afterward.

Rape Crisis Scotland provides a national rape crisis helpline and email support for anyone affected by sexual violence, no matter when or how it happened.

Having sex with anyone without their explicit consent is rape. If someone isn’t able to say yes then they have in fact said no and have not been able to consent. If they have not said yes, or even if they have said yes but later say no, it is still rape.