New psychoactive substance (so called ‘legal high’) Methiopropamine (MPA) Temporary Banning Order

3 December 2015

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From 27 November 2015 the sale and distribution of Methiopropamine (MPA) is banned and it will remain illegal for up to 12 months while drug experts consider its full range of harms.

MPA is known as a new psychoactive substance (or so called ‘legal high’) and is a stimulant, with users reporting similar effects to other illegal drugs such as MDMA, amphetamine, and cocaine – such as stimulation, alertness and an increase of energy and focus.

Adverse effects reported by users include: increased heart rate, anxiety, panic attacks, sweating, headaches, nausea, difficulty breathing, vomiting, difficulty urinating and sexual dysfunction. MPA has been implicated in hospital admissions and deaths in Scotland, often in combination with other substances. It has been banned due to its potential for harm.

What does this mean for you?

It is now illegal to sell, supply or give away this substance to friends. If the police suspects that you have a new psychoactive substance (or so called ‘legal high’) which contains a temporary class drug, they can confiscate the substance and dispose of it. Supplying someone else, including your friends, can get you fourteen years in jail and/or an unlimited fine under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971.

Crew, an Edinburgh based drug service with expertise in NPS, have produced a list of some of the NPS brand names that have listed MPA as an ingredient:

Blicc Ultra, Blow, Bubblez, Bullet, Bumpin, Candy Flip, Chang, Charles, Charly Sheen, China White, Columbian (Gold), Crystal Clear, Crystal, Doves Original (Form 4), Dust till Dawn, Exotic Strong, Focus, Go Gaine, Gogo Dust, Happy me (Euphor-e), Ivory Dove, Jumping Beans, M+Ms, Mind Melt, Pablo, Pink, Pink Panthers, Poke, Pulse, Quicksilver, Red Rhino, Rush, SCHNIFF, Snow Blind, Snow White, Spangled, Sparkle (E), Synthacaine, Walter White, WhiteMM.

After 27/11/2015, these may no longer contain MPA.

If you have a dependency to this drug and stop taking it you may experience withdrawal symptoms which can include seizures, sickness and diarrhoea, headaches, pains and hallucinations. If symptoms become too much seek medical help and in an emergency call 999.

Where to get advice?

For more information about new psychoactive substances, visit our drugs A-Z or call the Know the Score helpline on 0800 587 587 9 for free confidential advice and information.

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